Don't Reanimate Corpses! Frankenstein Part 1: Crash Course Literature 205



In which John Green teaches you about Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein. Sure, you know Frankenstein the cultural phenomenon, but how much do you know about the novel that started it all? You’ll learn about the Romantic movement in English lit, of which Frankenstein is a GREAT example, and you’ll learn that Frankenstein might just be the first SciFi novel. Once again, literature comes down to just what it means to be human. John will review the plot, and take you through a couple of different critical readings of the novel, and will discuss the final disposition of Percy Shelley’s heart.

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47 Comments

  1. Indeed, Frankenstein created the monster. But that doesn't mean he's not a monster.
    And he isn't really a doctor either. He dropped out in his third year after spending the entirety of the last year shut out in his dorm working on his little passion project. And if you think "well, he'd already learned everything." Graduating and that diploma are everything (plus you can't really use your freak of nature as a thesis if you just wind up regecting your thesis and said thesis runs away)

  2. Frankenstein the man was not at all a monster. He made the nameless creature he called monster not to play god but to try to end countless suffering. He was consumed by the vision of a world without death's greedy appetite snuffing out life into sorrow as flame to smoke. When the monster awoke Frankenstein was terrified by the eerie un-human creature. He made the first and terrible mistake of abandoning the newly created life. The next time he saw the monster it had already killed a child and indirectly a friend. So Frankenstein made the mistake again of shunning it. Later Frankenstein had the chance to satisfy it to save himself and his loved ones. But he made the decision not to in order to, he thought, save humanity. In the end it did cost him his wife's and his lives. Because of his fear and disgust all his noble quest ended in was death and suffering. The scientist was both brilliant and stupid, cowardly and heroic, full of hope and fear, and most of all very very human.

  3. 11:05. So what exactly was Satan’s misdeed? That he gave a human enlightenment, with fruit from the tree of KNOWLEDGE OF GOOD AND EVIL.

    I was a Christian a for many many years, but as a skeptic in my later years, I wonder why our creator would punish us for wanting KNOWLEDGE.
    Sounds like propaganda and political corruption if you ask me. Just be a sheeple everyone, and trust that the Illuminati have your best interests in mind. 👌

  4. The typical pathetic message that a lot of writers with their nonsensical often religious ideals are trying to present, that instead of trying to learn and evolve to become greater and greater you should be a slave of your current condition.

  5. It's clear John Green hasn't read the book, first of all they see the monster on the dogslegh, not Frankensten. Frankenstein is found on a floating ice sheet sometime later. Second of all, the book ends with the monster running off into the Arctic, nothing is revealed about what happens to Robert Walton afterward.

  6. It's clear John Green hasn't read the book, first of all they see the monster on the dogslegh, not Frankensten. Frankenstein is found on a floating ice sheet sometime later. Second of all, the book ends with the monster running off into the Arctic, nothing is revealed about what happens to Robert Walton afterward.

  7. It's clear John Green hasn't read the book, first of all they see the monster on the dogslegh, not Frankensten. Frankenstein is found on a floating ice sheet sometime later. Second of all, the book ends with the monster running off into the Arctic, nothing is revealed about what happens to Robert Walton afterward.

  8. It's clear John Green hasn't read the book, first of all they see the monster on the dogslegh, not Frankensten. Frankenstein is found on a floating ice sheet sometime later. Second of all, the book ends with the monster running off into the Arctic, nothing is revealed about what happens to Robert Walton afterward.

  9. It's clear John Green hasn't read the book, first of all they see the monster on the dogslegh, not Frankensten. Frankenstein is found on a floating ice sheet sometime later. Second of all, the book ends with the monster running off into the Arctic, nothing is revealed about what happens to Robert Walton afterward.

  10. It's clear John Green hasn't read the book, first of all they see the monster on the dogslegh, not Frankensten. Frankenstein is found on a floating ice sheet sometime later. Second of all, the book ends with the monster running off into the Arctic, nothing is revealed about what happens to Robert Walton afterward.

  11. Hi friends,

    does anyone know where/if I can get insight on their sources? I can't find them on their website.

    great video btw 🙂

  12. Quick Question – how can Victor as GOD ever be good, if he creates a being able to sin and yet punishes the creature for doing that which he is able to do –

  13. Did we read the same story? The monster did not visit Frankenstein before killing his brother and Elizabeth is not Frankensteins cousin, she's adopted by his family.

  14. Guys please help my teacher made this question "Write down five pieces of important information about the background and themes of the novel. "

  15. I really never liked the fact of comparing the creature to Satan. I mean, Satan tried to take over Heaven and made everybody's lives miserable. The creature, on the other hand, was never truly evil. He was just a misunderstood creature who was left to fend for himself, although, I have to admit, maybe he did go a little far with murder, but he didn't go on a murderous rampage like in the movies. He was just looking for revenge.

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